The Faculty

The Centre for the Study of Governance and Society brings together faculty from within the Department of Political Economy at King’s College London and leading universities around the world to advance crucial debates on governance.

Our Team

Mark Pennington

Mark Pennington is Professor of Political Economy and Public Policy in the Department of Political Economy, Head of the Department …

Mark Pennington is Professor of Political Economy and Public Policy in the Department of Political Economy, Head of the Department and Director of the Centre for the Study of Governance and Society.

Mark works at the intersection of philosophy, politics and economics and is particularly interested in the application of non-ideal theorising in both political and economic theory, as exemplified in his development of the ‘robust political economy’ paradigm.

Mark is currently working on major research project ‘The Ideal of Self Governance’, funded by the John Templeton Foundation. Inspired by the research agenda of Vincent and Elinor Ostrom, this project applies the robust political economy perspective to examine both the positive and normative case for governance arrangements that lie ‘beyond markets and states’.

Mark Pennington

Mark Pennington is Professor of Political Economy and Public Policy in the Department of Political Economy, Head of the Department and Director of the Centre for the Study of Governance and Society.

Mark works at the intersection of philosophy, politics and economics and is particularly interested in the application of non-ideal theorising in both political and economic theory, as exemplified in his development of the ‘robust political economy’ paradigm.

Mark is currently working on major research project ‘The Ideal of Self Governance’, funded by the John Templeton Foundation. Inspired by the research agenda of Vincent and Elinor Ostrom, this project applies the robust political economy perspective to examine both the positive and normative case for governance arrangements that lie ‘beyond markets and states’.

Samuel DeCanio

Samuel DeCanio is a Lecturer in the Department of Political Economy at King’s College London and Associate Director of the …

Samuel DeCanio is a Lecturer in the Department of Political Economy at King’s College London and Associate Director of the Centre for the Study of Governance and Society.

Dr. DeCanio studies general theoretical questions about how knowledge interacts with social institutions, and specific historical questions about the creation of modern states. His research examines these questions in the context of American politics, American political development, democratic theory, representation, state theory, and public opinion. Dr. DeCanio’s book, Democracy and the Origins of the American Regulatory State (Yale University Press, 2015), has been reviewed in the American Historical Review, Journal of American History, Journal of Politics, Perspectives on Politics, and the Washington Post. His book examines how high levels of voter ignorance prevent modern electorates from controlling the actions of democratic governments. He applies this argument to examine how political elites created the American regulatory state in the late 19th century.

His current research compares how knowledge interacts with markets and firms, democratic politics and political parties, and international relations among states. Prior to arriving at King’s he was an Assistant Professor in the political science department at Yale University.

Samuel DeCanio

Samuel DeCanio is a Lecturer in the Department of Political Economy at King’s College London and Associate Director of the Centre for the Study of Governance and Society.

Dr. DeCanio studies general theoretical questions about how knowledge interacts with social institutions, and specific historical questions about the creation of modern states. His research examines these questions in the context of American politics, American political development, democratic theory, representation, state theory, and public opinion. Dr. DeCanio’s book, Democracy and the Origins of the American Regulatory State (Yale University Press, 2015), has been reviewed in the American Historical Review, Journal of American History, Journal of Politics, Perspectives on Politics, and the Washington Post. His book examines how high levels of voter ignorance prevent modern electorates from controlling the actions of democratic governments. He applies this argument to examine how political elites created the American regulatory state in the late 19th century.

His current research compares how knowledge interacts with markets and firms, democratic politics and political parties, and international relations among states. Prior to arriving at King’s he was an Assistant Professor in the political science department at Yale University.

Bryan Cheang

Bryan Cheang is the Assistant Director of the Centre for the Study of Governance & Society. He received his PhD …

Bryan Cheang is the Assistant Director of the Centre for the Study of Governance & Society. He received his PhD and MA in Political Economy from King’s College London and is a graduate of the National University of Singapore. His research interests are in the political economy of development and applied economic policy, and his dissertation re-evaluated the nature and merits of the East Asian developmental state tradition.

He is broadly interested in questions surrounding state-market relations, comparative political economy and particularly, the challenges of successful industrial policy interventions. Bryan also brings with him his policy experience from the Singapore civil service.

Bryan Cheang

Bryan Cheang is the Assistant Director of the Centre for the Study of Governance & Society. He received his PhD and MA in Political Economy from King’s College London and is a graduate of the National University of Singapore. His research interests are in the political economy of development and applied economic policy, and his dissertation re-evaluated the nature and merits of the East Asian developmental state tradition.

He is broadly interested in questions surrounding state-market relations, comparative political economy and particularly, the challenges of successful industrial policy interventions. Bryan also brings with him his policy experience from the Singapore civil service.

Research Fellows

Pablo Paniagua

Dr. Pablo Paniagua is an economist and a Research Fellow at the Centre for the Study of Governance and Society. …

Dr. Pablo Paniagua is an economist and a Research Fellow at the Centre for the Study of Governance and Society. He is also a Senior Researcher at Fundación Para el Progreso and an Affiliated Scholar at the Ostrom Workshop at Indiana University Bloomington. He received his M.Sc. in Economics and Finance from Milan Polytechnic and his Ph.D. in Political Economy from the University of London.

His research focuses on governance and institutional analysis. He has authored over 20 articles, essays, and books dealing with various aspects of the political economy of money and banking and the governance of social dilemmas. His work has appeared in peer-reviewed journals including Journal of Institutional Economics, Journal of Evolutionary Economics, and Economy and Society, among several others.

Pablo Paniagua

Dr. Pablo Paniagua is an economist and a Research Fellow at the Centre for the Study of Governance and Society. He is also a Senior Researcher at Fundación Para el Progreso and an Affiliated Scholar at the Ostrom Workshop at Indiana University Bloomington. He received his M.Sc. in Economics and Finance from Milan Polytechnic and his Ph.D. in Political Economy from the University of London.

His research focuses on governance and institutional analysis. He has authored over 20 articles, essays, and books dealing with various aspects of the political economy of money and banking and the governance of social dilemmas. His work has appeared in peer-reviewed journals including Journal of Institutional Economics, Journal of Evolutionary Economics, and Economy and Society, among several others.

Shelby Grossman

Shelby Grossman is a research scholar at the Stanford Internet Observatory. She was previously an Assistant Professor of Political Science …

Shelby Grossman is a research scholar at the Stanford Internet Observatory. She was previously an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Memphis. Her primary research interests are in online disinformation, political economy of development, and sub-Saharan Africa.

Her research has been published or is forthcoming in Comparative Political Studies, PS: Political Science and Politics, Studies in Comparative and International Development, World Development, and World Politics. Her book, “The Politics of Order in Informal Markets: How the State Shapes Private Governance” was published by the Economics, Choice, and Society Series with Cambridge University Press. Shelby earned her PhD in Government from Harvard University in 2016.

Shelby Grossman

Shelby Grossman is a research scholar at the Stanford Internet Observatory. She was previously an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Memphis. Her primary research interests are in online disinformation, political economy of development, and sub-Saharan Africa.

Her research has been published or is forthcoming in Comparative Political Studies, PS: Political Science and Politics, Studies in Comparative and International Development, World Development, and World Politics. Her book, “The Politics of Order in Informal Markets: How the State Shapes Private Governance” was published by the Economics, Choice, and Society Series with Cambridge University Press. Shelby earned her PhD in Government from Harvard University in 2016.

Kaetana Numa

Kaetana Numa completed her PhD in Political Economy at King’s College London in spring 2021. Her PhD research focused on …

Kaetana Numa completed her PhD in Political Economy at King’s College London in spring 2021. Her PhD research focused on the theory of fiscal illusion, as she undertook a large-scale randomised survey experiment to investigate how the provision of personalised fiscal information affects fiscal preferences in the UK.

She is currently working on publishing her findings regarding the extent of fiscal illusion, as well as the wider implications of fiscal misperception on the democratic development and fiscal governance. She is also interested in the economic and political development of communist and transition countries.

Prior to her PhD research, Kaetana worked at a Lithuanian think tank for almost a decade where she headed a fiscal policy unit and maintained an active presence both in the political arena and the media.

Kaetana graduated with a BA in Economics and International Relations (Cum Laude) from Tufts University, and also holds an MA in Religious Studies from Vilnius University.

Kaetana Numa

Kaetana Numa completed her PhD in Political Economy at King’s College London in spring 2021. Her PhD research focused on the theory of fiscal illusion, as she undertook a large-scale randomised survey experiment to investigate how the provision of personalised fiscal information affects fiscal preferences in the UK.

She is currently working on publishing her findings regarding the extent of fiscal illusion, as well as the wider implications of fiscal misperception on the democratic development and fiscal governance. She is also interested in the economic and political development of communist and transition countries.

Prior to her PhD research, Kaetana worked at a Lithuanian think tank for almost a decade where she headed a fiscal policy unit and maintained an active presence both in the political arena and the media.

Kaetana graduated with a BA in Economics and International Relations (Cum Laude) from Tufts University, and also holds an MA in Religious Studies from Vilnius University.

Mark Bevir

Mark Bevir is Professor of Political Science and Director of the Center for British Studies at UC Berkeley. He is …

Mark Bevir is Professor of Political Science and Director of the Center for British Studies at UC Berkeley. He is also a Professor in Political Economy at King’s College, London, and Professor of Governance at United Nations University (MERIT).

Mark is a theorist in the social and policy sciences and generally works in the area of the philosophy of social science and intellectual history to develop and critique theories and policies.

He also collaborates with empirical researchers, using interpretive and critical theories to study Britain in a global context. He has also recently focused on governance and governmentality after neoliberalism and is currently exploring democratic innovation, social inclusion, and multiculturalism.

Mark Bevir

Mark Bevir is Professor of Political Science and Director of the Center for British Studies at UC Berkeley. He is also a Professor in Political Economy at King’s College, London, and Professor of Governance at United Nations University (MERIT).

Mark is a theorist in the social and policy sciences and generally works in the area of the philosophy of social science and intellectual history to develop and critique theories and policies.

He also collaborates with empirical researchers, using interpretive and critical theories to study Britain in a global context. He has also recently focused on governance and governmentality after neoliberalism and is currently exploring democratic innovation, social inclusion, and multiculturalism.

Pavel Kuchar

Pavel Kuchar is a Lecturer at the Department of Political Economy, King’s College London. Prior to joining King’s, he worked …

Pavel Kuchar is a Lecturer at the Department of Political Economy, King’s College London. Prior to joining King’s, he worked at the University of Bristol, the National Autonomous University of Mexico, or the Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University (China).

Looking into the role of institutional infrastructures in facilitating the functioning of markets, Pavel’s research has been focused on the political economy of entrepreneurship, economics of institutions, and the history of economics. In 2019, Pavel’s co-authored paper “Lachmann and Shackle: On the Joint Production of Interpretation Instruments” won the Warren Samuels Prize for Interdisciplinary Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology. He also co-edited of a volume on Governing Markets as Knowledge Commons published by Cambridge University Press (2021).

Pavel is a member of the World Interdisciplinary Network for Institutional Research (WINIR), and the History of Economic Thought Society (THETS). His writings can be accessed through his website.

Pavel Kuchar

Pavel Kuchar is a Lecturer at the Department of Political Economy, King’s College London. Prior to joining King’s, he worked at the University of Bristol, the National Autonomous University of Mexico, or the Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University (China).

Looking into the role of institutional infrastructures in facilitating the functioning of markets, Pavel’s research has been focused on the political economy of entrepreneurship, economics of institutions, and the history of economics. In 2019, Pavel’s co-authored paper “Lachmann and Shackle: On the Joint Production of Interpretation Instruments” won the Warren Samuels Prize for Interdisciplinary Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology. He also co-edited of a volume on Governing Markets as Knowledge Commons published by Cambridge University Press (2021).

Pavel is a member of the World Interdisciplinary Network for Institutional Research (WINIR), and the History of Economic Thought Society (THETS). His writings can be accessed through his website.

Robin Douglass

Robin Douglass joined the Department of Political Economy in 2012 and he is now Senior Lecturer in Political Theory. He …

Robin Douglass joined the Department of Political Economy in 2012 and he is now Senior Lecturer in Political Theory. He previously studied at the Universities of York and Exeter. His expertise is in the history of modern political thought and he is especially interested in assessing how interpretations of historical thinkers continue to influence and structure debates in contemporary political philosophy. He is the author of Rousseau and Hobbes: Nature, Free Will, and the Passions (Oxford University Press, 2015) and has published widely on seventeenth- and eighteenth-century political thought, as well as co-editing a forthcoming volume on Hobbes on Politics and Religion (Oxford University Press, 2018).

Robin’s most recent work examines Bernard Mandeville’s impact on eighteenth-century debates about sociability and commercial society, while future plans include a monograph on Mandeville’s political philosophy. Robin is a co-founder and current President of the European Hobbes Society, serves on the board of the Rousseau Association, and is co-editor of the European Journal of Political Theory.

Robin Douglass

Robin Douglass joined the Department of Political Economy in 2012 and he is now Senior Lecturer in Political Theory. He previously studied at the Universities of York and Exeter. His expertise is in the history of modern political thought and he is especially interested in assessing how interpretations of historical thinkers continue to influence and structure debates in contemporary political philosophy. He is the author of Rousseau and Hobbes: Nature, Free Will, and the Passions (Oxford University Press, 2015) and has published widely on seventeenth- and eighteenth-century political thought, as well as co-editing a forthcoming volume on Hobbes on Politics and Religion (Oxford University Press, 2018).

Robin’s most recent work examines Bernard Mandeville’s impact on eighteenth-century debates about sociability and commercial society, while future plans include a monograph on Mandeville’s political philosophy. Robin is a co-founder and current President of the European Hobbes Society, serves on the board of the Rousseau Association, and is co-editor of the European Journal of Political Theory.

Carmen Pavel

Carmen Pavel is a Lecturer in International Politics in the Department of Political Economy at King’s College London, and has …

Carmen Pavel is a Lecturer in International Politics in the Department of Political Economy at King’s College London, and has previously held positions at the University of Virginia and University of Arizona. Her interests include liberal theory and contemporary challenges to it, ethics and public policy, environmental ethics, international justice and the authority of international law. Carmen has published her first book Divided Sovereignty: International Institutions and the Limits of State Authority with Oxford University Press in 2015 and is the editor of the volume The Oxford Handbook of Freedom (with David Schmidtz) published in 2018. Her articles have appeared in Political StudiesLaw and PhilosophyJournal of Global Ethics, and Social Theory and Practice. Carmen’s second book project, tentatively entitled Reasons for International Rules: Dynamic Coordination, State Consent, and Binding Law, examines under what conditions international law is compatible with the sovereignty claims of constitutional democracies.

Carmen Pavel

Carmen Pavel is a Lecturer in International Politics in the Department of Political Economy at King’s College London, and has previously held positions at the University of Virginia and University of Arizona. Her interests include liberal theory and contemporary challenges to it, ethics and public policy, environmental ethics, international justice and the authority of international law. Carmen has published her first book Divided Sovereignty: International Institutions and the Limits of State Authority with Oxford University Press in 2015 and is the editor of the volume The Oxford Handbook of Freedom (with David Schmidtz) published in 2018. Her articles have appeared in Political StudiesLaw and PhilosophyJournal of Global Ethics, and Social Theory and Practice. Carmen’s second book project, tentatively entitled Reasons for International Rules: Dynamic Coordination, State Consent, and Binding Law, examines under what conditions international law is compatible with the sovereignty claims of constitutional democracies.

Peter John

Peter John is Professor of Public Policy in the Department of Political Economy at King’s College London. He is known …

Peter John is Professor of Public Policy in the Department of Political Economy at King’s College London. He is known for his work on agenda-setting, local politics, behavioral interventions, and randomized controlled trials.

He is author of Analyzing Public Policy (2012), which reviews the main theories of public policy and the policy process. He is interested in how best to involve citizens in public policy and management, often deploying behavioural interventions. He tests many of these interventions with randomized controlled trials. Some of these trials appeared in Nudge, Nudge, Think, Think: Experimenting with Ways to Change Civic Behaviour (Bloomsbury, 2011). Practical issues with the design of experiments are covered in Field Experiments in Political Science and Public Policy (Routledge, 2017). Experiments are also used to examine the impact of social media and politics in Political Turbulence: How Social Media Shape Collective Action (Princeton University Press, 2015), with Helen Margetts, Scott Hale and Taha Yasseri.

A more general approach to the use of the tools of government to achieve policy change is contained in his Making Policy Work (Routledge, 2011). His most recent book is How Far to Nudge: Assessing Behavioural Public Policy (Edward Elgar).

Peter John

Peter John is Professor of Public Policy in the Department of Political Economy at King’s College London. He is known for his work on agenda-setting, local politics, behavioral interventions, and randomized controlled trials.

He is author of Analyzing Public Policy (2012), which reviews the main theories of public policy and the policy process. He is interested in how best to involve citizens in public policy and management, often deploying behavioural interventions. He tests many of these interventions with randomized controlled trials. Some of these trials appeared in Nudge, Nudge, Think, Think: Experimenting with Ways to Change Civic Behaviour (Bloomsbury, 2011). Practical issues with the design of experiments are covered in Field Experiments in Political Science and Public Policy (Routledge, 2017). Experiments are also used to examine the impact of social media and politics in Political Turbulence: How Social Media Shape Collective Action (Princeton University Press, 2015), with Helen Margetts, Scott Hale and Taha Yasseri.

A more general approach to the use of the tools of government to achieve policy change is contained in his Making Policy Work (Routledge, 2011). His most recent book is How Far to Nudge: Assessing Behavioural Public Policy (Edward Elgar).

Paul Lewis

Paul Lewis is Reader in Economics and Public Policy. He was educated at Peterhouse, Cambridge, and Christ Church, Oxford. Prior …

Paul Lewis is Reader in Economics and Public Policy. He was educated at Peterhouse, Cambridge, and Christ Church, Oxford. Prior to moving to King’s, he was a Newton Trust Lecturer in the Faculty of Economics and Politics, and the Faculty of Social and Political Sciences, Cambridge University, and a Fellow of Emmanuel and Selwyn Colleges. He is a retained supervisor in economics at Peterhouse, Cambridge, and a member of the Cambridge Social Ontology Group. He was a Visiting Fellow of Peterhouse, Cambridge, and the Shackle Scholar at St Edmund’s College, Cambridge, in the Easter Term 2013. He won the 2016 Society for the Development of Austrian Economics for the Best Essay in Austrian Economics, for his paper on “The Emergence of ‘Emergence’ in the Work of F.A. Hayek: An Historical Analysis”.

Paul Lewis

Paul Lewis is Reader in Economics and Public Policy. He was educated at Peterhouse, Cambridge, and Christ Church, Oxford. Prior to moving to King’s, he was a Newton Trust Lecturer in the Faculty of Economics and Politics, and the Faculty of Social and Political Sciences, Cambridge University, and a Fellow of Emmanuel and Selwyn Colleges. He is a retained supervisor in economics at Peterhouse, Cambridge, and a member of the Cambridge Social Ontology Group. He was a Visiting Fellow of Peterhouse, Cambridge, and the Shackle Scholar at St Edmund’s College, Cambridge, in the Easter Term 2013. He won the 2016 Society for the Development of Austrian Economics for the Best Essay in Austrian Economics, for his paper on “The Emergence of ‘Emergence’ in the Work of F.A. Hayek: An Historical Analysis”.

Christel Koop

Dr Christel Koop is Senior Lecturer in Political Economy. Her research interests include delegation theory, arm’s length governance, regulation and …

Dr Christel Koop is Senior Lecturer in Political Economy. Her research interests include delegation theory, arm’s length governance, regulation and regulatory agencies, democratic accountability and legitimacy, and institutional theory.

Christel holds a BA and MPhil degree in political science from Leiden University, the Netherlands, and obtained her PhD degree in political and social sciences from the European University Institute in Florence, Italy. Before joining the department, she was Fellow in Public Policy and Administration at the London School of Economics and Political Science. She is also co-organiser of the inter-university London Public Policy Seminars.

Christel’s research addresses questions related to the insulation of policy-making from politics and the electoral process, both at the national and the European level. Her work has focused on the determinants of arm’s length governance as well as on its implications for politics, policy outcomes, and democratic accountability and legitimacy.

Christel Koop

Dr Christel Koop is Senior Lecturer in Political Economy. Her research interests include delegation theory, arm’s length governance, regulation and regulatory agencies, democratic accountability and legitimacy, and institutional theory.

Christel holds a BA and MPhil degree in political science from Leiden University, the Netherlands, and obtained her PhD degree in political and social sciences from the European University Institute in Florence, Italy. Before joining the department, she was Fellow in Public Policy and Administration at the London School of Economics and Political Science. She is also co-organiser of the inter-university London Public Policy Seminars.

Christel’s research addresses questions related to the insulation of policy-making from politics and the electoral process, both at the national and the European level. Her work has focused on the determinants of arm’s length governance as well as on its implications for politics, policy outcomes, and democratic accountability and legitimacy.

Gabriel Leon

Dr Gabriel Leon is a senior lecturer in the Department of Political Economy at King’s College London. His research focuses …

Dr Gabriel Leon is a senior lecturer in the Department of Political Economy at King’s College London. His research focuses on conflict, civil-military relations, institutional development and economic history. Gabriel’s current work examines the causes of riots, how riots spread, and the social and political consequences they have. He also works on gentrification (with a focus on London), the political development of England in the medieval period, and on how the military and popular protest can drive political change.

Before joining King’s, Gabriel was the Bevil Mabey Fellow in Economics at St Catharine’s College, University of Cambridge. He studied applied mathematics at Harvard (BA) and economics at Oxford (DPhil/PhD). Between his degrees, he worked as an associate consultant in the NYC offices of Bain & Company.

Personal website: https://gabrieljleon.wordpress.com/

Gabriel Leon

Dr Gabriel Leon is a senior lecturer in the Department of Political Economy at King’s College London. His research focuses on conflict, civil-military relations, institutional development and economic history. Gabriel’s current work examines the causes of riots, how riots spread, and the social and political consequences they have. He also works on gentrification (with a focus on London), the political development of England in the medieval period, and on how the military and popular protest can drive political change.

Before joining King’s, Gabriel was the Bevil Mabey Fellow in Economics at St Catharine’s College, University of Cambridge. He studied applied mathematics at Harvard (BA) and economics at Oxford (DPhil/PhD). Between his degrees, he worked as an associate consultant in the NYC offices of Bain & Company.

Personal website: https://gabrieljleon.wordpress.com/

Anja Shortland

Anja Shortland is a Reader in Political Economy and has worked at the King’s Department of Political Economy since 2013. …

Anja Shortland is a Reader in Political Economy and has worked at the King’s Department of Political Economy since 2013. She studied Engineering at Oxford and has a PhD in International Relations from LSE. Anja works on the economics of crime and violence, usually with an interdisciplinary approach. Anja’s current research examines the governance of criminal markets. She is particularly interested in the governance of tricky and opaque transactions between legal entities and extra-legal groups such as protection contracts, the trade in hostages, maritime piracy, and stolen art. Her work contrasts the highly effective, polycentric governance architecture created by insurers to stabilize and order these markets with problematic government participation in the economic underworld- e.g. the ransoming of hostages from terrorist groups. Anja has consulted widely on Somali piracy, including for the World Bank. She is currently writing a book on Kidnap for Ransom for Oxford University Press (forthcoming 2018).

Anja Shortland

Anja Shortland is a Reader in Political Economy and has worked at the King’s Department of Political Economy since 2013. She studied Engineering at Oxford and has a PhD in International Relations from LSE. Anja works on the economics of crime and violence, usually with an interdisciplinary approach. Anja’s current research examines the governance of criminal markets. She is particularly interested in the governance of tricky and opaque transactions between legal entities and extra-legal groups such as protection contracts, the trade in hostages, maritime piracy, and stolen art. Her work contrasts the highly effective, polycentric governance architecture created by insurers to stabilize and order these markets with problematic government participation in the economic underworld- e.g. the ransoming of hostages from terrorist groups. Anja has consulted widely on Somali piracy, including for the World Bank. She is currently writing a book on Kidnap for Ransom for Oxford University Press (forthcoming 2018).

John Meadowcroft

John Meadowcroft is Senior Lecturer in Public Policy in the Department of Political Economy at King’s College London. His research …

John Meadowcroft is Senior Lecturer in Public Policy in the Department of Political Economy at King’s College London. His research focuses on the threats to free societies – societies in which individual liberty is protected and valued – in the light of the historical evidence that free societies are far less stable than is often assumed. He is presently pursuing this research via ethnographic research into UK far right organisations with his research collaborator Elizabeth Morrow. This involves attending demonstrations held by far right groups around the UK and interviewing participants.

In the past John’s research has focused more on theories of liberty and power, on the ethics and limits of markets, on the generation and destruction of social capital, and on evaluation of economic and political solutions to social problems, notably in healthcare. He is the author of The Ethics of the Market (Palgrave, 2005), co-author with Mark Pennington of Rescuing Social Capital from Social Democracy (Institute of Economic Affairs, 2007), and author of an intellectual biography of the founder of public choice theory, James M. Buchanan (Continuum, 2011/Bloomsbury, 2013).

Personal website: https://johnmeadowcroft.net

John Meadowcroft

John Meadowcroft is Senior Lecturer in Public Policy in the Department of Political Economy at King’s College London. His research focuses on the threats to free societies – societies in which individual liberty is protected and valued – in the light of the historical evidence that free societies are far less stable than is often assumed. He is presently pursuing this research via ethnographic research into UK far right organisations with his research collaborator Elizabeth Morrow. This involves attending demonstrations held by far right groups around the UK and interviewing participants.

In the past John’s research has focused more on theories of liberty and power, on the ethics and limits of markets, on the generation and destruction of social capital, and on evaluation of economic and political solutions to social problems, notably in healthcare. He is the author of The Ethics of the Market (Palgrave, 2005), co-author with Mark Pennington of Rescuing Social Capital from Social Democracy (Institute of Economic Affairs, 2007), and author of an intellectual biography of the founder of public choice theory, James M. Buchanan (Continuum, 2011/Bloomsbury, 2013).

Personal website: https://johnmeadowcroft.net

Paul Sagar

Paul Sagar read PPE at Balliol College, Oxford before taking an MA in Intellectual History and the History of Political …

Paul Sagar read PPE at Balliol College, Oxford before taking an MA in Intellectual History and the History of Political Thought from the University of London. He completed his doctorate at the University of Cambridge, where from 2014-2018 he was Junior Research Fellow in Politics at King’s College.

Paul Sagar works in the history of political thought and contemporary political theory. His recent monograph, The Opinion of Mankind: Sociability and the State from Hobbes to Smith, explores Enlightenment accounts of the foundations of modern politics, whilst also addressing contemporary issues regarding how to conceive of the state, and what that means for normative political theory today. He has also published a number of studies on topics such as: the political writings of Bernard Williams, so-called ‘realist’ approaches to political philosophy, the nature of liberty under conditions of modernity, and the idea of immortality. Paul is currently in the early stages of two major new projects. The first is a monograph study of Adam Smith’s political philosophy as rooted in his conceptions of history and commercial society. The second is an exploration of the idea of the enemy in the history of political thought.

As well as his academic writings, Paul also writes for more popular audiences. His work has appeared in The GuardianThe Times Literary SupplementAeon.co, and The Political Quarterly. See his personal website for details.

Paul Sagar

Paul Sagar read PPE at Balliol College, Oxford before taking an MA in Intellectual History and the History of Political Thought from the University of London. He completed his doctorate at the University of Cambridge, where from 2014-2018 he was Junior Research Fellow in Politics at King’s College.

Paul Sagar works in the history of political thought and contemporary political theory. His recent monograph, The Opinion of Mankind: Sociability and the State from Hobbes to Smith, explores Enlightenment accounts of the foundations of modern politics, whilst also addressing contemporary issues regarding how to conceive of the state, and what that means for normative political theory today. He has also published a number of studies on topics such as: the political writings of Bernard Williams, so-called ‘realist’ approaches to political philosophy, the nature of liberty under conditions of modernity, and the idea of immortality. Paul is currently in the early stages of two major new projects. The first is a monograph study of Adam Smith’s political philosophy as rooted in his conceptions of history and commercial society. The second is an exploration of the idea of the enemy in the history of political thought.

As well as his academic writings, Paul also writes for more popular audiences. His work has appeared in The GuardianThe Times Literary SupplementAeon.co, and The Political Quarterly. See his personal website for details.

Bryan Cheang

Bryan Cheang is the Assistant Director of the Centre for the Study of Governance & Society. He received his PhD …

Bryan Cheang is the Assistant Director of the Centre for the Study of Governance & Society. He received his PhD and MA in Political Economy from King’s College London and is a graduate of the National University of Singapore. His research interests are in the political economy of development and applied economic policy, and his dissertation re-evaluated the nature and merits of the East Asian developmental state tradition.

He is broadly interested in questions surrounding state-market relations, comparative political economy and particularly, the challenges of successful industrial policy interventions. Bryan also brings with him his policy experience from the Singapore civil service.

Bryan Cheang

Bryan Cheang is the Assistant Director of the Centre for the Study of Governance & Society. He received his PhD and MA in Political Economy from King’s College London and is a graduate of the National University of Singapore. His research interests are in the political economy of development and applied economic policy, and his dissertation re-evaluated the nature and merits of the East Asian developmental state tradition.

He is broadly interested in questions surrounding state-market relations, comparative political economy and particularly, the challenges of successful industrial policy interventions. Bryan also brings with him his policy experience from the Singapore civil service.

Vera Kichanova

Vera Kichanova is an urbanist and journalist from Russia currently seeking her PhD degree in Public Policy at King’s College …

Vera Kichanova is an urbanist and journalist from Russia currently seeking her PhD degree in Public Policy at King’s College London. In parallel, she works as an urban policy researcher at Zaha Hadid Architects. Previously, she worked as Editor-in-Chief at Kiev-based Reed.media, an educational online media outlet focusing on post-Soviet countries.

In 2012, she was elected to the Municipal Council in Moscow as an independent non-partisan candidate. Apart from leading Russian media outlets, her comments were published by The New York Times, Forbes, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal and Spiegel. Vera is a regular panelist at international conferences and the 2013 Democracy Award winner (by the US National Endowment for Democracy).

Vera holds a Master of Public Policy degree from the University of Oxford and an Applied Master’s degree with honours in Journalism from Moscow State University. The goal of her PhD dissertation is to find out whether grassroots cooperation can replace the top-down approach in urban development.

Vera Kichanova

Vera Kichanova is an urbanist and journalist from Russia currently seeking her PhD degree in Public Policy at King’s College London. In parallel, she works as an urban policy researcher at Zaha Hadid Architects. Previously, she worked as Editor-in-Chief at Kiev-based Reed.media, an educational online media outlet focusing on post-Soviet countries.

In 2012, she was elected to the Municipal Council in Moscow as an independent non-partisan candidate. Apart from leading Russian media outlets, her comments were published by The New York Times, Forbes, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal and Spiegel. Vera is a regular panelist at international conferences and the 2013 Democracy Award winner (by the US National Endowment for Democracy).

Vera holds a Master of Public Policy degree from the University of Oxford and an Applied Master’s degree with honours in Journalism from Moscow State University. The goal of her PhD dissertation is to find out whether grassroots cooperation can replace the top-down approach in urban development.